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Human Resources course recruitment and selection from the British Open University

Human Resources course
Human Resources course


Course details:


12 hours
The course and certificate are free of charge
 The course online

In this free course, Human Resources: Recruitment and Selection, we are looking at the first stage of managing people - attracting and selecting employees. Recruitment and selection is usually one process. However, here we will distinguish between procedures and preliminary considerations when planning staff recruitment and the process of selecting an individual from a group of applicants. Employment must be carefully planned in order to attract the right type of applicant. Ultimately, this increases the chances of making the appropriate selection and appointment. Your participation may be limited to discussing the need for a specific job within your team or work area, or you may be asked to meet job applicants. Whatever your post

Effective recruitment and selection:


The key to successful hiring is ensuring that the matching criteria are public and relevant to the job itself. Once these standards are accepted and shared, it is possible to make more rational decisions about how suitable a person is for a job, based on evidence rather than "instinct" or instinct. Effective hiring and selection should not be about lottery luck. Systematic planning and preparation will increase the likelihood of engaging with the right person. The key to effective hiring is preparation: knowing the job and what is required of a person to perform well. The costs of recruiting the wrong person can be significant. The cost of hiring a person may be at least twice that of their salary when adding factors such as training, expenses, and employer contributions to their pensions.

 Overview:


The course begins by looking at how it can be difficult for the manager in the recruitment and selection process to maintain objectivity. Setting the process can help set clear criteria for use throughout the recruitment and selection process. It then addresses the difference between a person-job and person-organized approach to employment. Subsequent sections review the different tasks to be completed and the different ways a manager can use in this important process.

Incorrect assumptions about class, gender, ethnic group, physical ability, or any other type of discrimination can obscure your objectivity in employment and selection. In the worst case this may conflict with existing legislation to protect individuals from discrimination. Other prejudices may arise through specific organizational traditions relating to the "type of person" deemed appropriate. However, it is important to ensure that the attributes of a successful applicant correspond to what the organization requires, perhaps in terms of looking to the future, customer-focused or market-oriented. It is easy to distinguish the hiring and selection process through personal responses and reactions to specific types of people. The recruiter's awareness is often influenced by the striking characteristics or similarities to themselves. This is called an "aura" effect and can work in either positive or negative direction (the latter is sometimes called the "pods" effect). The halo effect acts as a filter for any information that conflicts with first impressions. For example, a person who enrolled in the same college or university as the recruiter would be at an advantage, while a person who did not wear a suit would not be an administrative subject. People often judge more favorably those individuals who have something in common with them. In the end, you are looking for the best person for the job and any discrimination, whether intentional or not, may prevent you from achieving this. The halo effect acts as a filter for any information that conflicts with first impressions. For example, a person who enrolled in the same college or university as the recruiter would be at an advantage, while a person who did not wear a suit would not be an administrative subject. People often judge more favorably those individuals who have something in common with them. In the end, you are looking for the best person for the job and any discrimination, whether intentional or not, may prevent you from achieving this. The halo effect acts as a filter for any information that conflicts with first impressions. For example, a person who enrolled in the same college or university as the recruiter would be at an advantage, while a person who did not wear a suit would not be an administrative subject. People often judge more favorably those individuals who have something in common with them. In the end, you are looking for the best person for the job and any discrimination, whether intentional or not, may prevent you from achieving this.

Learning Outcomes :


After studying this course, you should be able to:
List the skills and knowledge necessary for a complete and fair selection and selection process
Perform a full and fair systematic appointment and selection.

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